Brrrring on the Cold! Keeping Pets Warm in Winter

Keeping pets warm in winter is an essential part of pet safety and responsible pet ownership

Many people are aware of how dangerous overheating in pets can be, but what about the cold? In fact, pets can be at risk for medical problems in cold weather, and are just as likely to get hypothermia (low body temperature) or frostbite as their owners.

It’s a common misconception that a pet’s fur protects them from the cold. In reality, fur is not adequate protection from the elements, especially in extreme weather or if your pet is not acclimated to colder temperatures.

Like humans, pets will tolerate cold to different degrees, depending on their age, breed, coat density, nutritional stores, overall general health, and physical conditioning.  Northern breeds of dog can tolerate cold weather better than a short haired chihuahua, for example. But keep in mind that all dogs (and cats!) need shelter from winter wind, cold, and wet.

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The Pet Experts FAQs: What You Might Not Know About Pet Microchips

Pet microchips help lost pets become found pets.Your cat may be a neighborhood explorer. They go over fences, cross streets, and see what life has in store on the other side of the tracks. Until one day, they just don’t return home. If they’re not microchipped, you might elect to staple flyers on telephone pole, place ads online, and encourage others to share posts on social media to help reunite you with your best buddy.

Similarly, some dogs bolt out of their front doors, dig beneath gates, or pull on their leashes until they’re free. Sometimes, they come back when called. But all too often, they become separated from their owners.

The good news is that pet microchips aid in the swift homecoming of lost, missing, and even stolen pets. In spite of their widespread popularity, some owners wait or decide not to microchip. With the following FAQs, the Pet Experts hope to dispel any misconceptions. Continue…

What You Need to Know About Running with Your Dog

Running with your dog is great pet exercise and promotes pet healthIf you’re a runner, and you have a dog, combining the two may seem like a no-brainer. You and your dog both get the benefits of a good workout, and the time spent together can strengthen your relationship. Because running with your dog carries certain risks, and not all dogs are good candidates for that type of exercise, it’s important to make sure you cover your bases as far as safety precautions, and The Pet Experts at Springbrook Animal Care Center are here to help!

But First, Come See Us

Just like humans, pets should have a wellness exam prior to beginning any new exercise program. Your veterinarian will make sure your pet is healthy enough for strenuous exercise and up-to-date on their vaccines and parasite protection. Continue…

How Do You Know? Top 5 Signs of Lyme Disease in Dogs

lyme diseaseMost people shudder at the idea of ticks, but that doesn’t stop us from hiking, camping, picnicking, or working in the yard. Even though these 8-legged pests are sneaky, insidious, and hungry for blood, we still enjoy the great outdoors – and so do our dogs. After all, who hasn’t seen a dog rolling around the grass with utter abandon? Frolicking and exploring are a canine’s birthright, but Lyme disease in dogs remains a serious concern. As such, The Pet Experts of Springbrook Animal Care Center offer the top 5 clinical signs of Lyme disease so you can seek help immediately.

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Wildlife in the ‘Hood: Keeping Your Pets Safe from Coyotes

As our communities grow, we continue to encroach further and further into the natural habitats of many species of wildlife. Coyotes are quickly joining the ranks of squirrels, raccoons, skunks, and other wild animals that have adapted to the ever-expanding human population, making prevention strategies to keep pets safe from coyotes more important now than ever.

Coyote Concerns

Coyotes prey on small mammals and occupy an important place in their natural ecosystems by helping to keep rodent populations down. Coyotes are also opportunistic, and as human homes and businesses encroach on coyote habitat, they will turn to whatever food source is easily available, including garbage and even small pets!

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What to Do If You Find a Baby Bird

BabyBirdsSpring is in the air, which means that birds will begin building their nests and raising their families. It’s also the time of year when many veterinarians, pet stores, and wildlife rescue services receive a large number of calls about an orphaned baby bird found by good Samaritans who want to help.

While our first instinct may be to rescue what we think are lost baby birds, it is important to note that the vast majority have not actually been abandoned – and intervening can do more harm than good.

How to Tell if a Baby Bird Is in Danger

The first thing to determine is how young the bird is:

  • A hatchling, also referred to as a nestling, will be bald, with downy fur or pin-like feathers, and its eyes will be closed.

  • A fledgling, also called a branchling, will have some or all of its feathers, a short tail, and fully opened eyes.

  • Hatchlings usually fall from nests accidentally. Despite the old wives tales, birds have a very poor sense of smell and will welcome a missing baby Continue…